How can I do this? I think it's NAT.

I have two sites connected with USG20s, let's call them Network A (10.0.0.0/24) and Network B (192.168.1.0/24). Network A has a server that sends out a UDP packet to 10.0.0.201. I need to make that packet go to 192.168.1.7 but I am having no luck. Any ideas? 

All Replies

  • PeterUK
    PeterUK Posts: 2,704  Guru Member
    First Anniversary 10 Comments Friend Collector First Answer

    10.0.0.201 is within Network A (10.0.0.0/24 ) so it will not go over the WAN to the WAN of Network B (192.168.1.0/24).

    Their might be a another way if you can send out a UDP packet to 10.0.0.xxx to a virtual interface on 10.0.0.0/24 say 10.0.0.254 you then do a NAT rule to the WAN of Network B and routing rule to SNAT from Network A WAN of the traffic.


    Then Network B NAT to 192.168.1.7


  • SteveM67
    SteveM67 Posts: 2
    Yeah, for reasons, the packet is hard-coded to go to 10.0.0.201. I was thinking of a virtual server/interface that then translated to 192.168.1.7 and sent through the tunnel but somehow, I am just not sure I am doing it right.
  • PeterUK
    PeterUK Posts: 2,704  Guru Member
    First Anniversary 10 Comments Friend Collector First Answer

    The virtual interface way would work as long as you don't have a device with 10.0.0.201

    So Network A virtual interface 10.0.0.201 on 10.0.0.0/24

    NAT

    incoming interface like LAN1

    external IP User Defined 10.0.0.201

    internal IP User Defined the WAN of Network B

    port mapping the port its sending out to.

    Routing

    incoming interface

    member like LAN1

    service the port 10.0.0.201 is sending

    next-hop

    type interface

    interface like WAN1

    source network address translation outgoing-interface


    on Network B

    NAT

    incoming interface like WAN1

    external IP WAN1 address object interface

    internal IP User Defined 192.168.1.7

    port mapping the port its sending out to.


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